Introduction and Aims
People who use illicit drugs (PWUD) often engage in drug use during hospitalisation. Adverse outcomes may arise from efforts to conceal inpatient drug use, especially in hospital settings that rely on abstinence‐based policies. Harm reduction interventions, including supervised drug consumption services, have not been well studied in hospital settings. This study examines factors associated with willingness to use an in‐hospital supervised inhalation room (SIR) among people who smoke crack cocaine in Vancouver, Canada.

Design and Methods
Cross‐sectional data from two open prospective cohorts of PWUD involving people who smoke crack cocaine were collected between June 2013 and May 2014. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with willingness to use an in‐hospital SIR.

Results
Among 539 participants, 320 (59.4%) reported willingness to use an in‐hospital SIR. Independent factors positively associated with willingness included: ever used drugs in hospital [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.89], and daily non‐injection crack use (AOR = 1.63). Difficulty accessing new crack pipes (AOR = 0.51) was negatively associated with willingness (all P < 0.05). The most commonly reported reasons for willingness were to: remain in hospital (50.6%), reduce drug‐related risks (25.6%) and reduce the stress of hospital discharge for using drugs (24.7%).

Discussion and Conclusions
A high proportion of people who smoke crack cocaine reported willingness to use an in‐hospital SIR, and those willing were more likely to report heavy drug use and previous in‐hospital use. These findings highlight the potential utility of SIRs to complement existing in‐hospital services for PWUD.

Sandra Cortina Mary Clare Kennedy Huiru Dong Nadia Fairbairn Kanna Hayashi M‐J Milloy Thomas Kerr
Drug and Alcohol Review, Volume 37, Issue 5, July 2018
https://doi.org/10.1111/dar.12815
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/dar.12815