Psychiatric Symptoms, Psychosocial Factors, and Life Satisfaction Among Persons With Serious Mental Illness: A Path Analysis [2020]

This study explores the effects of biopsychosocial factors on life satisfaction among persons with serious mental illness. Participants in this study included a convenience sample of 194 adults recruited from Texas and Wisconsin. A path analysis was conducted with psychiatric symptoms as an exogenous variable, and illness insight, social self-efficacy, social support, community integration, and life satisfaction as endogenous variables. Beginning with a hypothesized model, a best model was obtained after removing the paths that were not significant and adding recommended paths supported by theory. In the final model, psychiatric symptoms, social self-efficacy, social support, and community integration were directly associated with life satisfaction. Illness insight did not directly affect life satisfaction but had indirect effects. Psychiatric symptoms may be the most important and direct predictor of life satisfaction; illness insight, social self-efficacy, social support, and community integration buffer the direct of effect of psychiatric symptoms on life satisfaction.

Sánchez, Jennifer PhD, CRC, LMHC; Wadsworth, John S. PhD, CRC; Frain, Michael P. PhD, CRC; Umucu, Emre PhD, CRC; Chan, Fong PhD, CRC
The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, August 2020 – Volume 208 – Issue 8
DOI: 10.1097/NMD.0000000000001166
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